ASP-1
After passing Dogpatch heading west from FLSG-A you came to a “    ” intersection with a left turn that took you past the Sea Bee camp on the right and wound its way up to ASP-1 along the base of Hill 327.
Joe Capozzo
When I arrived in April of 1966 the compound consisted of nothing more than a collection of tents. The only hooch with a tin roof was the Officer’s hooch. There was no mess hall, we had to take a deuce and a half down the mountain, back through Dogpatch, and into FLSG-A for our meals. If you were pulling guard duty you received C-rations for supper. Shortly after my arrival we built an enlisted club and a movie screen. Martha Raye  did a performance for us on a stage erected in front of the screen.
Rex
Joe Capozzo
The next five photos form a sort of panorama. In the first photo on the left you are   looking  north towards Red Beach, you can just make out Dogpatch in the distance, then in sequence your view travels east, the airport buildings are in the distance, then southeast, Marble Mountain is just off the left edge,then south by the first helipad photo, and finally southwest by the second helipad photo.
When entering the main tent compound from the main road that cut through the ammo dump you passed three “Moral” signs. I lost the third and cannot remember what advice it had.
Walking the other way into the dump you were greeted with this view.
Joe Capozzo
If you continued to walk in this westerly direction you came upon a nice pond the Sea Bee’s carved out for us. It didn’t last long though, with the Vietnamese heat and sun the pond was declared unfit for humans by the corpsman and was closed. If you walked another 100 yards or so you eventually stumbled onto the EOD section and the western boundary of the dump.
Brought to you from Joe Capozzo: The ASP-1 Home Movies, click on any of the thumbnails to download or view the movies. Movies are in  AVI and WMV formats.
AVI
AVI
AVI
WMV
WMV
WMV
The following views of the dump were kindly donated by Joe Capozzo. Others where noted .
“The Loader” Roger Chaput
The Helipad
Wayne Rhodes
Wayne Rhodes
Joe Capozzo
Joe Capozzo
Joe Capozzo
Ah! Finally the “New” Hooches! Built by the Sea Bees and a very welcome relief from the old tents. When the sun was shining, that was practically every day, the old tents were so hot you could pour peanut butter like honey! The new hooches were cooler and much better to live in than the tents.This first photo shows one of the first hooches with the corrugated metal roofs in the far left of the photo.
The SeaBees, with the help and expert advice from  some of us, removed and replaced our tent city one by one. As luck would have it the tent I was living in was the last to be completed. My tent and the penultimate can be seen in in the first of these two photos. The second photo is the finish line.
T